Saturday, July 4, 2020

Bishop’s Mardi Gras to Benefit Catholic Education

Must Read

Saints for Today: Mary Euphrasia Pelletier, Religious (1796 – 1868)

Dr. Pelletier baptized his infant daughter at home because of the anti-Catholic persecution then raging.

Saints for Today: St. Irenaeus, Bishop & Martyr (130-220)

Irenaeus is without a doubt one of the greatest theologians of the second century.

Announcement of Death of Douglas McNeill, Former Priest of the Diocese

To the people of the Diocese of Gallup, The Diocese of Gallup has been informed of the passing of Douglas...
Suzanne Hammonshttp://dioceseofgallup.org
Suzanne Hammons is the editor of the Voice of the Southwest and the media coordinator for the Diocese of Gallup. A graduate of Benedictine College in Kansas, she joined the Diocesan staff in 2012.

While preparations are underway for Fat Tuesday celebrations in New Orleans, the Diocese of Gallup prepares for its own annual tradition: the Bishop’s Mardi Gras.

Held each year on the weekend before Ash Wednesday and sponsored by the local organization Catholic Peoples Foundation, the Bishop’s Mardi Gras aims to provide a night of food, music, and dance while functioning as a yearly fundraiser. For the 2014 event, the Foundation plans to use the proceeds to support Catholic Schools throughout the Diocese.

At a time when many Catholic schools in the Diocese of Gallup strive to keep costs low for the many low-income students who attend, the fundraiser could provide a welcome relief. According to data recently released by the Office of Catholic Schools for the Diocese, over half of all students rely on tuition assistance, but the income received from tuition by the schools only covers 37 percent of the students’ per pupil cost.

The Bishop’s Mardi Gras will also feature a silent auction, with the profit from the auction adding to the total amount raised over the night’s events.

Herb Mosher is the head of the Catholic Peoples Foundation and, along with the CPF Board, has re-focused the priorities of the organization for 2014.

“First, the Foundation will support Catholic education within the Diocese of Gallup by increasing scholarship funds, improving facilities and expanding religious education,” he said. “Secondly, CPF supports the education of seminarians who will become priests for the Diocese, and in addition continues to seek funds for the repair of historic churches within the Diocese.”

According to the mission statement provided by Mosher, the goal of the Foundation is “to receive, raise and administer funds in order to assist the religious, charitable and educational works of the Diocese of Gallup.” Noting that the Foundation is a non-profit organization, the mission statement concludes by stating that “the Foundation benefits some of the poorest people in the nation while also providing important tax savings for donors.”

To reserve a table, purchase tickets, or find out more information about the 2014 Bishop’s Mardi Gras, contact Amanda Galvez at 505-726-8295, or email [email protected]

 

Comments

comments

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest News

Where to give and receive help during the Coronavirus

Are you in need of help, or would you like to give back in some way to your local community? Contact any of these organizations.

Advertisement

Other recent stories:

Meet the Diocese’s New Director of Religious Education

The Director of Religious Education oversees mission work, youth ministry, and catechesis for the whole diocese.

One Loss, One Win: Supreme Court Prioritizes Abortion in One Case but Supports Religious Education in Another

The U.S. Bishops spoke out against one ruling and in favor of another.
video

Considering a call as a deacon? The Diocese of Gallup’s diaconate program is enrolling for Fall 2020

"Deacons are called to service, deacons are called to assist at the altar, deacons are called to make up what is lacking in other ministries of the Church."

AZ Bishops Welcome Supreme Court Decision on DACA

"We are very much mindful that DACA children were often brought to this country at a very young age and through no responsibility of their own.  They were raised in the United States, attend our schools, make positive contributions to our society, and do not know any other country but our own."

Advertisement

More Articles Like This

Comments

comments