Monday, February 17, 2020

Our Lady of Guadalupe, Patroness of the Diocese of Gallup

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Dr. Jean Lee
Jean M. Lee, M.A., D.Min., is a licensed behavioral health and substance abuse counselor, founding a nonprofit, state-licensed behavior health counseling agency and Christian gift/book store. Volunteer work includes: Jail ministry, Legion of Mary membership, door-to-door evangelization, and writing a weekly newspaper column titled “Faith and Inspiration: Encyclopedia of Saints for Today.” A Catholic revert after 32 years away from the Church, she is devout in the Catholic faith, loves the saints, and lives a deeper spiritual/religious and more joyful life since returning to the Church.

Fundamentalists are sometimes horrified when Mary is referred to as the Mother of God. A woman is a man’s mother either if she carried him in her womb or if she was the woman contributing half of his genetic matter or both. Mary was the mother of Jesus in both of these senses; because she not only carried Jesus in her womb but also supplied all of the genetic matter for his human body, since it was through her—not Joseph—that Jesus “was descended from David according to the flesh” (Rom. 1:3).

Since Mary is Jesus’ mother, it must be concluded that she is also the Mother of God: If Mary is the mother of Jesus, and if Jesus is God, then Mary is the Mother of God. Although Mary is the Mother of God, she is not his mother in the sense that she is older than God or the source of her Son’s divinity, for she is neither. Rather, we say that she is the Mother of God in the sense that she carried in her womb a divine person—Jesus Christ, God “in the flesh” (2 John 7, cf. John 1:14)—and in the sense that she contributed the genetic matter to the human form God took in Jesus Christ.

To avoid this conclusion, Fundamentalists often assert that Mary did not carry God in her womb, but only carried Christ’s human nature. This assertion reinvents a heresy from the fifth century known as Nestorianism, which runs aground on the fact that a mother does not merely carry the human nature of her child in her womb. Rather, she carries the person of her child. Women do not give birth to human natures; they give birth to persons. Mary thus carried and gave birth to the person of Jesus Christ, and the person she gave birth to was God.

Throughout the Church’s liturgical seasons, many feasts are honored in the memory and honor of Mary, being the Mother of God and of Jesus Christ. One such important Marian feast, Our Lady of Guadalupe, is held each year on December 12th in memory of the apparition of Mary in Mexico in the year 1531. Our Lady of Guadalupe remains one of the most intriguing Marian apparitions. Chronicles of that period tell us the story: A fifty-seven-year-old widower named Juan Diego who lived in a small village near Mexico City was on his way to a nearby barrio to attend Mass one Saturday morning. He was walking by a hill called Tepeyac when he heard beautiful music like the warbling of birds. A radiant cloud appeared and within it a young Native maiden dressed like an Aztec princess. The lady spoke to Diego in a local Indian tongue, Nahuatl, and sent him to the bishop of Mexico City. The bishop was to build a church in the place where the lady appeared.

Eventually the bishop told Juan Diego to have the lady give him a sign. About this same time Juan Diego’s uncle became seriously ill. This led poor Diego to try to avoid the lady. The lady found Diego, nevertheless, assured him that his uncle would recover and provided roses (blooming nearby despite its being mid-winter) for Juan to carry to the bishop in his cape or tilma.

When Juan Diego opened his tilma in the bishop’s presence, the roses fell to the ground and the bishop sank to his knees. On Juan Diego’s tilma appeared an image of Mary, exactly as she had appeared at the hill of Tepeyac. The chapel in honor of Mary was immediately erected and since then is the most visited Marian shrine in all the world. From this apparition of Mary it is believed that nine million Indians became Catholic in a very short time, thus a rebuke to the rude and cruel treatment of the Indians by the Spaniards. In these days when we hear so much about God’s preferential option for the poor, Our Lady of Guadalupe cries out to us that God’s love for and identification with the poor is an age-old truth that stems from the gospel itself.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Catholic Answers. “Mary the Mother of God.” Web. 10 December 2013.
Foley, Leonard, O.F.M., and Pat McCloskey, O.F.M. “Saint of the Day-Updated and Expanded.” Cincinnati: Franciscan Media, 2013.
Heritage, Andrew, ed. “The Book of Saints: A Day-By Illustrated Encyclopedia.” San Francisco: Weldonowen, 2012.

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